Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Systems Acquisition Job Support Tool (JST)

Overview

This Job Support Tool (JST) identifies “acquisition best practices” that Program Management Offices (PMOs) should consider in establishing and executing Foreign Military Sales (FMS) systems acquisition programs beginning with considering potential defense sales in a program’s Acquisition Strategy, then assisting potential purchasers in identifying requirements, leading to delivery of a total package capability. It also provides key areas for analysis and evaluation for each phase of the “FMS Systems Acquisition Process” described in Figure 1 to improve acquisition outcomes for the FMS customer.

Figure 1: FMS Systems Acquisition Process Overview

Section

Phase

Description

1

Acquisition Planning

FMS Systems Acquisition Planning

2

Pre-LOR

Pre-Letter of Request (LOR) Customer Engagement

3

LOR

Receipt and analysis of the LOR

4

LOA

Preparation of a Letter of Offer and Acceptance (LOA)

5

RFP

Preparing the Request for Proposal (RFP)

6

Contract

Negotiating and awarding contracts

7

Execution

Managing contract and program execution

8

Delivery

Preparing for and delivering a “total package”

One of the most challenging aspects of FMS systems acquisition for prospective purchasers is adequately describing and articulating the breadth and depth of their requirements. Complex FMS systems acquisition programs come in all shapes and sizes. Experience has shown that complex FMS systems acquisition efforts involve prospective FMS purchasers that:

  • Use specialized acquisition organizations who routinely acquire new capabilities from the U.S. that want to “participate” in DoD acquisition and contracting efforts
  • May be unfamiliar with the myriad of DoD policies and processes used to purchase and operate complex weapon systems, requiring substantial PMO assistance throughout the process
  • Are interested in pursuing substantial modifications to the “DoD version” of the system, which means that the equivalent of an Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase will need to be defined and conducted prior to actual production
  • Are considering acquisition of a non-Program of Record (POR) or non-standard system with DoD assistance
  • Are interested in acquiring the DoD version of the system but establish and provide their own training and logistics support after production units are delivered
  • Would like to acquire a system developed in response to a Joint Urgent Operational Need (JUON) where traditional FMS Total Package Approach (TPA) support may be complicated
  • May be considering complex FMS/DCS hybrid solutions which require precise definition of the “boundaries” between the FMS and DCS aspects of the purchaser’s system acquisition efforts

The LOR that a purchaser submits for a complex systems acquisition program which may include one or more of the characteristics described above must accurately describe the requirements and approach they want to pursue. The LOR must also be “actionable” from a DoD perspective to provide a solid foundation for LOA development.

Organization

This JST, which is designed to augment DAG Chapter 1 (paragraph 4.2.8) and DAG International Acquisition and Exportability (IA&E) Supplement CH 1-S-7 guidance on FMS planning and the Security Assistance/FMS aspects of the DoD acquisition process, is organized in eight sections as shown in Figure 1.

Note: This JST focuses on acquisition best practices applicable to complex FMS systems sales rather than more routine FMS transactions. Furthermore, this JST focuses on the acquisition-related elements of the FMS process and is not intended to address all policy and procedural elements of the process. For comprehensive information on FMS policies and procedures please take advantage of the training courses and learning guides provided by DSCA’s Defense Institute of Security Cooperation Studies (DISCS).

Relationship to Other JSTs

For DoD acquisition programs, DAG Chapter 1 (paragraph 4.2.8.3) recommends that Program Managers conduct an IA&E Assessment to collect information and assess factors related to future FMS planning. Please refer to the IA&E Assessment JST for best practice guidance in this area. Moreover, DoD acquisition Program Managers must develop an Acquisition Strategy International Involvement section to address 10 USC 2431a (subparagraph (c)(2)(G)) and 10 USC 2350a (para (e)) and DoD 5000 series requirements regarding future FMS planning considerations. Please refer to the Acquisition Strategy – International Considerations JST for best practice guidance in this area. For DoD acquisition programs that require initial development or updating of an Acquisition Strategy, PMOs should pursue any applicable FMS planning efforts described in this FMS Systems Acquisition JST in parallel with development of FMS planning-related content in the Acquisition Strategy International Involvement section.

Section 1 – FMS Systems Acquisition Planning

A. FMS-Related IA&E Assessment and Acquisition Strategy Aspects

Step 1

Use the results from Section 2.D. (International Markets) of the IA&E Assessment JST as a key input in PMO/project office defense sales opportunities identification efforts

Step 2

Use the program’s Acquisition Strategy – International Involvement section (based on the results from Section 2.F. (Foreign Sales Policy) of the Acquisition Strategy – International Considerations JST as a key input in evaluation of defense sales opportunities

Step 3

Consult the DAG International Acquisition and Exportability (IA&E) Supplement CH 1-S-7 for an overview of DoD acquisition process-related U.S. Government and DoD-level Security Cooperation/FMS policies and practices

B. Analysis & Evaluation -- Key Areas

What are the motivations for pursuing potential FMS System sales arrangements? Who are the key U.S. and foreign officials (if any) interested in advocating FMS system sales with prospective foreign customer nations? What are their primary objectives?

Have your organization’s internal FMS planning efforts identified potentially viable FMS customers interested in the system’s operational characteristics and DoD’s system acquisition program plans?

Have the PMO, PEO, and/or local command confirmed DoD Component support for future FMS system sales at an appropriate level? What type of DoD Component-level FMS system sales policy (if any) is being considered (e.g., Navy Technology Transfer and Security Assistance Review Board (TTSARB), Air Force “Top Line”, Army Defense Exports & Cooperation Review)?

Have initial Technology Security and Foreign Disclosure (TSFD) and export control boundaries for potential FMS System sales been explored and established prior to raising potential customer expectations through PMO engagement activities?

Has your organization consulted with other DoD Components and higher level DoD organizations e.g., the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) and the Defense Technology Security Administration (DTSA)) as appropriate to help define a DoD-wide FMS system sales policy?

Once DoD Component and, if applicable, a DoD-level FMS system sales policy has been established and initial TSFD and export control authorizations have been obtained; what type of FMS customer engagement activities does your organization envision (e.g., forward leaning, responsive, passive)?

Has your organization established Non-Recurring Cost charges for any item of Major Defense Equipment (MDE) in accordance with DoDD 2140.02?

Has your organization developed a TPA concept for an FMS purchaser making an initial acquisition of the system?

Section 2 – Pre-Letter of Request (LOR) Customer Engagement

A. Best Practices

Step 1

PMOs should make it easy for prospective FMS purchaser to submit well-defined, actionable complex systems acquisition program LORs which address a TPA

  • Develop and make available LOR checklists and/or other tools to key stakeholders (all USG/DoD organizations involved in the process and the foreign customer)
  • Checklists should address not only weapon system requirements, but all elements required to deliver a total package capability including logistics support, training, services, technical data, etc.
  • Engage the prospective purchaser through the DoD Component Security Assistance Implementing Agency (IA), U.S. Embassy, Security Cooperation Organization (SCO), or directly through authorized purchaser nation representatives, as appropriate
  • Ensure the purchaser understands the risks of establishing country-unique configuration requirements on future cost, delivery timing, overall program risk, and on life cycle cost
  • Engage U.S. industry business development counterparts, as appropriate, to synchronize communication with the purchaser (especially important on hybrid programs)

Step 2

Determine if an initial planning LOA should be established to provide DoD manpower, site surveys, and travel funding to assist the purchaser in defining requirements that will eventually lead to development of a LOA for the entire system (including its TPA aspects)

Step 3

Maintain close contact with SCO and/or authorized purchasing nation representatives while the LOR is being developed and offer assistance, as appropriate

Step 4

  • When appropriate, encourage the SCO to initiate a Pre-Letter of Request Assessment Request (PAR) so that development of USG/DoD TSFD guidance for the potential sale as discussed in SAMM Chapter 3 (Technology Transfer and Disclosure) C3.1.2. can be initiated prior to submission of a LOR
  • Consult with the local Foreign Disclosure Office (FDO) and DoD Component International Program Office (IPO)/Security Assistance IA and initiate development of TSFD guidance in the pertinent TSFD “pipes” (including program protection and anti-tamper), as appropriate

Step 5

Make PMO and Integrated Product Team (IPT) subject matter experts available to provide programmatic and technical support during initial TSFD review and approval process activities

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Has an LOR checklist been prepared with adequate detail to assist the prospective purchaser in developing an actionable LOR and has this checklist been provided to the country and all DoD organizations involved in the process?

Has an effective communication channel been established with the country either through the SCO or directly with the country to assist them in identifying their requirements and understanding the effect of any unique requirements they are considering?

Is there adequate pre-LOA FMS Administrative Surcharge funding available to support PMO engagement with the country to define requirements?

Has the PMO engaged with U.S. industry business development personnel, as appropriate, to synchronize communications with the country and gain awareness of industry perspectives?

Has a planning LOA been considered to support program definition, help define the country’s requirements, conduct site surveys, etc?

Has the PMO encouraged the SCO to submit a PAR and consulted with their FDO and DoD Component IPO to initiate development of USG/DoD TSFD guidance for the system in the pertinent TSFD “pipes” in advance of LOR submission?

Is the PMO able to make SMEs available, if required, to provide programmatic and technical support during initial TSFD review and approval process activities? Is there funding available to support SME efforts in this area?

Are there any other actions that the PMO can take to ensure that the country submits an actionable LOR?

Section 3 – Receipt and Analysis of the LOR

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Upon receipt, analyze the LOR and conduct an acquisition risk assessment to determine if the FMS case involves a routine low risk procurement of a standard item or a complex systems acquisition program (as described above) which could entail programmatic risk with potential cost increases and/or schedule delays. Pay particular attention to system sales that involve DoD programs that are:

  • Still in the DoD Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase or Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) process
  • Conducting major system upgrade development efforts
  • Conducting first time integration of purchaser-desired equipment or capabilities (often referred to as “Non-Standard Program of Record (POR)” efforts)
  • Developing/producing equipment related to DoD systems that are not part of the DoD POR (often referred to as “Non-POR” efforts)

Step 2

For LORs determined to pose high acquisition risks based on the analysis in Step 1 above especially potential Non-Standard POR and non-POR system purchases inform the DoD Component Security Assistance IA and, if appropriate, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), of these risks and provide a recommendation on whether the LOR requires modification prior to acceptance. If the LOR requires modification:

  • Identify any key acquisition program ambiguities/unknowns that should be explored and analyzed to adequately define unique purchaser requirements (i.e., purchaser requirements beyond the system’s DoD-approved capability/acquisition program requirements documentation) to reduce cost, schedule, and performance acquisition risks to an acceptable level
  • If appropriate, engage in additional LOR discussions with authorized purchaser representatives, including acquisition/technical SMEs as appropriate, to resolve key ambiguities/unknowns
  • In parallel with LOR discussions, continue PMO consultations with the local FDO and DoD Component IPO, as appropriate, to obtain USG/DoD TSFD guidance in pertinent TSFD “pipes” to address any LOR modifications envisioned by the purchaser
  • Upon completion of the LOR modification discussions, ask the purchaser to submit a modified LOR prior to development of a LOA for the entire system (including its TPA aspects)

Step 3

Identify exportable configuration impacts resulting from TSFD “pipe” policy guidance during the development of P&A or LOA data per SAMM Chapter 3 (Technology Transfer and Disclosure):

  • Examine all aspects of the system (major end item, support equipment, training equipment, technical manuals, etc.) from a Defense Exportability Features (DEF) perspective
  • Determine if additional DEF program protection measures and/or differential capability modifications are required
  • Define the cost and schedule impacts of required development and testing activities associated with the exportable configuration that must be included in the P&A or LOA data

Step 4

Determine any required LOR advisory memoranda and/or other unique reviews required by SAMM Chapter 5 (FMS Case Development) Table C5.T4 that are applicable to the sale. Provide support to the DoD Component Security Assistance IA and DSCA as required to fulfill these requirements

Step 5

In consultation with the DoD Component Security Assistance IA, seek and obtain whatever clarifications and/or additional information is necessary through the SCO (or directly with the purchaser) if the LOR is not considered to be actionable

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Is the LOR for a procurement of a Non-Standard POR or Non-POR system version (rather than a POR system version) that may involve substantial development work (and associated programmatic risks) which may require increased program management and IPT expertise and efforts?

Should the LOR be accepted or are additional discussions with the customer recommended to ensure they understand the potential risks involved in the acquisition?

Is the LOR complete and actionable to enable delivery of a total package capability or is additional information required from the FMS purchaser?

Has the PMO in consultation with the local FDO and DoD Component IPO obtained sufficient USG/DoD TSFD guidance from the pertinent TSFD “pipes” to respond to the LOR?

Have all pertinent DoD Component and OSD approvals or LOR advisory memoranda (e.g., Yockey Waiver, etc.) been identified and has action been initiated to obtain required reviews and approvals?

Has the PMO been able to adequately define the cost and schedule impacts of required development and testing activities associated with the exportable configuration that must be included in the P&A or LOA data?

Have the effects of TSFD policies, including anti-tamper, on all aspects of the weapons system configuration, including support elements been determined and have all required development and testing activities been identified?

Does the PMO consider the LOR for an LOA actionable, noting that once the LOR is accepted as actionable, the purchaser will expect DoD to be able to fulfill the LOR’s stated requirements?

Section 4 – Preparation of a Letter of Offer and Acceptance (LOA)

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Use the USG/DoD TSFD guidance obtained from the pertinent TSFD “pipes” during “Receipt and Analysis of the LOR” to develop LOA data that address the following areas:

  • Confirm that DEF cost and schedule impacts are included in the LOA data
  • Consult with the DoD Component Anti-Tamper organization and Anti-Tamper Executive Agent (ATEA) to ensure an approved AT plan is in place and associated AT costs are included in pricing data (SAMM Chapter 3 (Technology Transfer and Security) C3.6.2. and C3.6.3.)
  • Ensure differential capability modifications required by policy guidance from pertinent TSFD “pipes” are included in pricing data for the exportable version of the system approved for offer to the prospective purchaser

Step 2

Develop LOA pricing data according to the following:

  • Develop a pricing strategy for each element of the LOR using a TPA and apply the same cost estimating and pricing methodologies used for similar DoD procurements, including an appropriate management reserve
  • Ensure the effect of country-unique requirements and TSFD policy guidance (see above) including exportable configuration development and testing requirements are included in the pricing information and factored into the schedule availability
  • If applicable and available obtain offset costs from U.S. contractor(s) and include these costs in line 1 of the LOA (not spread across other line items)
  • Determine if manpower beyond the Standard Level of Service (SLS) (SAMM Chapter 9 Financial Policies and Procedures) Table C9.T2.) funded by Administrative Surcharge funds is required for case execution and include any applicable manpower and travel funding in the LOA either in a services line or included directly in the price of the material (SAMM Chapter 5 (FMS Case Development) C5.4.8.)

Step 3

Develop LOA availability (schedule estimate) data according to the following:

  • Determine the lead times associated for required development, integration, and testing activities required by county-unique requirements or TSFD-required configuration changes
  • Integrate the customer’s requirements into the program’s production delivery schedule
  • Establish an estimated contracting lead-time based on competition requirements and determine whether a definitized or Undefinitized Contract Action (UCA) is planned
  • Promote customer understanding of the potential effects of the use of a UCA (both positive and negative)

Step 4

Establish a dialog with U.S. industry bounded by the competitive environment and determine whether the LOR contained a sole source request

Step 5

Involve the purchaser in the preparation process including meeting attendance and correspondence exchanges to clarify LOR information (SAMM Chapter 5 (FMS Case Development) C5.4.5.2.)

Step 6

Address any LOA-specific considerations that may apply, including the following:

  • Based on the complexity of the sale, determine if a Case Development Extenuating Factor (CDEF) is applicable necessitating a longer LOA preparation time than identified in SAMM Chapter 5 (FMS Case Development) Table C5.T6. and include the appropriate code in the Defense Security Assistance Management System (DSAMS)
  • Identify transportation and distribution requirements. Transportation Plans are required for Ammunition, and Explosives (AA&E) and classified materiel, but are encouraged for all cases that include materiel that is oversize, overweight, hazardous, perishable, pilferable, or requires any special handling. Assess viable transportation and distribution options supportive of customer preferences during case development and begin development of the transportation plan required for LOAs involving the shipment of classified or sensitive materials (SAMM Chapter 7 (Transportation) C7.13.)
  • Begin development of the FMS case Master Plan (SAMM Chapter 2 (SCO and Case Manager Responsibilities) C.2.2.5.) to effectively manage the FMS LOA once signed

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Have the effects of country-unique requirements and TSFD policy guidance including exportable configuration development and testing requirements been adequately considered, included in the pricing information, and factored into the schedule availability? Is an approved AT plan in place?

For a Non-Standard POR or Non-POR complex systems acquisition program, has the PMO been able to adequately identify and address country-unique configuration requirements, DEF differential capability, anti-tamper, other program protection requirements, TPA, and any other unique aspects in the LOA data?

For a FMS/DCS hybrid complex systems acquisition program, has the PMO been able to adequately identify and address the respective “division of labor” scope of work and management responsibilities between the FMS LOA(s) and DCS contract(s) in areas such as country-unique configuration requirements, DEF differential capability, anti-tamper, other program protection requirements, Government Furnished Material (GFX), and future product improvement/logistics support arrangements?

Has the PMO developed the LOA prices and schedules with the same amount of rigor as a DoD “domestic” acquisition program?

Has the purchaser been involved in the development and preparation of the LOA so that they understand its contents? If not, what steps should be taken after offering an LOA to ensure purchaser understanding?

Section 5 – Preparing the Request for Proposal (RFP)

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Analyze the LOA and prepare a new or modified Acquisition Plan for the FMS system sale (which may be a POR, Non-Standard POR, or Non-POR acquisition effort) following DoD Component procedures noting whether the customer has requested a sole source procurement (SAMM Chapter 6 (FMS Case Implementation and Execution) C6.3.4.)

Step 2

Where practical, combine DoD and FMS requirements in the same contract or contract modification(s):

  • Separately identify the FMS requirements in the solicitation and contracting action(s) including the case identifier
  • Ensure LOA terms and conditions are incorporated into the contracting action(s)
  • Ensure shipping terms for the FMS materiel are included

Step 3

Address FMS-unique FAR/DFARS requirements in the RFP (SAMM Chapter 6 (FMS Case Implementation and Execution) Table C6.T1)

Step 4

Develop FMS purchase-related contractual documents (statements of work, program work statements, specifications, etc.) consistent with the LOA

Step 5

Encourage FMS customers to participate in developing technical specifications, establishing delivery schedules, identifying any special warranty provisions or other unique requirements, and reviewing prices of varying alternatives, quantities, and options needed to make price-performance tradeoffs (SAMM Chapter 6 (FMS Case Implementation and Execution) C.6.3.5.2.)

Step 6

Ensure that TPA-related logistics support/sustainment considerations regarding Contractor Logistics Support (CLS), Performance Based Logistics (PBL), and Integrated Product Support (IPS) are understood by DoD, the purchaser, and the contractor, and adequately addressed in the RFP and proposal

Step 7

Ensure contractor understanding of the USG/DoD TSFD, export control, and DEF policies and decisions relevant to the FMS contracting action(s)

Step 8

Ensure contractor understanding of the information that must be submitted in the proposal to substantiate offset costs

Step 9

Review new and modified Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) requirements and determine CDRL items that should be provided to the purchaser to enhance transparency while ensuring that “U.S. only” CDRL items are handled, safeguarded, and protected in accordance with USG/DoD cyber and information security policies and procedures

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Have DoD and FMS purchaser requirements been consolidated on the same contracting action(s) if more expedient and cost effective?

Has there been adequate purchaser participation in preparation of the RFP to ensure the contracting action(s) will meet the requirements stated in the LOR and any subsequent clarifications thereto?

Has the purchaser been made aware of above normal program risks, and how the DoD and the contractor plan to mitigate these risks?

Are TPA-related logistics support/sustainment considerations regarding CLS, PBL, and IPS adequately addressed by DoD, the purchaser, and the contractor in the RFP and proposal?

Has the contractor been provided with USG/DoD TSFD, export control, and DEF policies and decisions relevant to the contracting action(s) and does the contractor understand this guidance?

Does the contractor understand the type of information that is expected to be provided in the proposal on any offset costs?

Section 6 – Negotiating and Awarding Contracts

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Address FMS purchaser requests to participate in source selection or contract negotiations per SAMM Chapter 6 (FMS Case Implementation and Execution) C.6.3.5. guidance. Representatives of the FMS purchaser can participate in contract negotiations at the discretion of the contracting officer but cannot observe or participate in negotiations involving certified cost or pricing data, unless a deviation is granted (DFARS 225.7304)

Step 2

Respond to FMS purchaser requests for information on FMS contract prices or contractual documents based on SAMM Chapter 6 (FMS Case Implementation and Execution) C6.3.6. guidance

Step 3

After contract award align the LOA value and payment schedule as required based on the values of negotiated contracts

Step 4

Alert the DoD Component IPO, IA, DSCA, and the customer as soon as possible of unanticipated increases in cost or delays in schedule

Step 5

Update the FMS case Master Plan (SAMM Chapter 2 (SCO and Case Manager Responsibilities) C2.2.5) as required

Step 6

Ensure that the contract Statement of Work (SOW) and Contract Line Item Number (CLIN) structure is consistent with the USG/DoD TSFD, export control, and DEF policies and decisions relevant to the contracting action(s) so that “U.S. only” efforts and deliverable data are handled, safeguarded, and protected in accordance with USG/DoD cyber and information security policies and procedures

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Do PMO personnel know how to respond to FMS purchaser requests to participate in source selection or contract negotiations and to requests for information on contract prices or for contractual documents?

Do the contracting action SOW, CLIN structure, and CDRL requirements comply with USG/DoD TSFD, export control, and DEF policies and decisions regarding the handling, safeguarding, and protection of U.S.-only efforts and deliverable data in accordance with USG/DoD cyber and information security policies and procedures?

Have CDRL deliverables been reviewed to determine appropriate items that could be provided to the purchaser to promote transparency in contract execution?

Does the FMS case Master Plan and/or the LOA payment schedule need to be updated based on the negotiated contract terms?

Section 7 – Managing Contract and Program Execution

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Employ normal program management and risk management practices for the FMS system sale including early identification of risks and assessment of possible courses of action

Step 2

Ensure close communication with DoD stakeholders and the FMS purchaser on LOA execution and maintain a close dialogue with the DoD Component IA and SCO on any significant issues that arise

Step 3

Ensure close communication with industry – “one team approach” and consider pre-meetings with the contractor before Program Management Reviews (PMRs)

Step 4

Establish program controls to ensure that the PMO and contractor comply with USG/DoD TSFD, export control cyber, and information security policies and procedures for the FMS system sale, including changes that may occur post-LOA signature and contract award

Step 5

Look for opportunities to enhance transparency with the FMS purchaser during contract and program execution

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Has the PMO established protocols for communicating program execution status so that DoD stakeholders and the FMS purchaser are kept informed of any issues to avoid surprises?

Have protocols between the PMO and contractor been established for communicating program execution status to USG and foreign stakeholders so that information is consistent?

Have the PMO and contractor established adequate program controls to ensure that they comply with current and evolving USG/DoD TSFD, export control, cyber, and information security policies and procedures?

Have actions to promote customer transparency and participation during program execution been identified and evaluated?

Section 8 – Preparing for and Delivering a Total Package

A. Best Practices

Step 1

Evaluate TSFD and export control policy compliance prior to delivery, and ensure that AT Validation and Verification (V&V) testing is completed 60 days prior to hardware export. Exports of weapons systems or components that contain CPI may not be made until the DoD ATEA has issued final written concurrence of satisfactory V&V testing (SAMM Chapter 3 (Technology Transfer and Disclosure) C3.6.3.)

Step 2

Perform a final quality review of transportation arrangements including verification that the required export shipment documentation (LOA, transportation plan, DSP-94, other USG or purchaser nation export/import approvals, etc. as required) has been provided to the port of embarkation to enable Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to clear shipments for export (SAMM Chapter 7 (Transportation) C7.17.)

Step 3

Monitor the FMS purchaser’s activities required to prepare to receive the contract deliverables including facilities construction

Step 4

Increase the PMO focus on case closure actions which should have been incrementally accomplished throughout LOA execution

Step 5

Work with the customer to promote a smooth transition of responsibility from system procurement, initial fielding, and initial support through follow-on “steady state” logistics support

B. Analysis and Evaluation -- Key Areas

Does the system equipment, logistics support, and technical data planned for delivery comply with pertinent USG/DoD TSFD and export control policy guidance? Has DoD AT V&V testing been completed?

Have all elements for successful transportation of system equipment and logistics support been established, including documentation required for USG and purchaser nation export/import and customs clearance?

Has the PMO discussed follow-on logistics support with the FMS purchaser to ensure a successful transition to “steady state” system operations?

Note: If you would like to provide feedback on this JST, have ideas on how the JST could be improved, have questions on this JST, or would like advice on how to use this JST in the workplace, please send an email to InternationalHelp@dau.mil.

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